Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

Both sides previous revision Previous revision
Next revision
Previous revision
Last revision Both sides next revision
feral_hamper [2009-02-05 18:02]
katerich
feral_hamper [2009-02-06 14:24]
katerich
Line 1: Line 1:
 ===== Feral Hamper Xmas 08 ===== ===== Feral Hamper Xmas 08 =====
 +http://flickr.com/photos/foam/sets/72157612858777553/detail/
 == == == ==
 A discriminating selection of ferally traded groceries, hand-sourced from their producers and traded outside the commercial food sector.  A discriminating selection of ferally traded groceries, hand-sourced from their producers and traded outside the commercial food sector. 
Line 44: Line 44:
  
 ==  8. Cacao from Brazil == ==  8. Cacao from Brazil ==
-This raw cacao bean in shell hails from Bahia, a massive cacao cashpot. Plantations date back to colonial times, their lawns sport lavish white landowner houses. The cacao is little used or appreciated locally, except perhaps in condensed milk cocktails: production is entirely for the export market. Recent blight has meant the cacao produced is worth a little less - it still sells but the quality is lower. This cacao was grown on a farm called Pura Vida, named by English tourists who bought it and decided to make the farm a collective property via selling shares. Investors can visit whenever they like, although as foreigners they can't live there all the time for visa reasons. The cacao workers - usually itinerant - were asked to stay on and cultivate a garden to feed themselves, run the cacao plantation as a business. Most of the workers are not literate and have trouble with the bookkeeping. A recent visitor to the estate, UK artist Lottie Child, described the arrangement as straightforward compassionate colonialism. Visitors to the plantation can spend all day eating and watching donkeys work. The cacao was exported in hand baggage of two Pura Vida shareholders, Sam and Elin. A local man, Gilson, ferried them across the river in his boat to the nearby town of Ubaitaba. The cacao travelled by bus overnight to Salvador from where it is a short plane ride  to San Paolo where the cheaper international flights to London Heathrow depart. The cotton bag the cacao arrived in has Bahian seed burrs gained in transit still clinging to it. Lottie Child went to St Peters newsagent in Islington, London to pick up the bag - Sam and Elin live next door - then cycled to Govinda Hare Krishna restaurant in Soho to deliver. Along with other hamper products, the cacao was transported to Brussels via wheeled suitcase, train, tube, Eurostar and FoAM company car. Recipe suggestion: grind up a handful of cacao, handful of oats with water and honey in the blender for breakfast. There is no need to remove the shell.+This raw cacao bean in shell hails from Bahia, a massive cacao cashpot. Plantations date back to colonial times, their lawns sport lavish white landowner houses. The cacao is little used or appreciated locally, except perhaps in condensed milk cocktails: production is entirely for the export market. Recent blight has meant the cacao produced is worth a little less - it still sells but the quality is lower. This cacao was grown on a farm called Pura Vida, named by English tourists who bought it and decided to make the farm a collective property via selling shares. Investors can visit whenever they like, although as foreigners they can't live there all the time for visa reasons. The cacao workers - usually itinerant - were asked to stay on and cultivate a garden to feed themselves, run the cacao plantation as a business. Most of the workers are not literate and have trouble with the bookkeeping. A recent visitor to the estate, UK artist Lottie Child, described the arrangement as straightforward compassionate colonialism. Visitors to the plantation can spend all day eating and watching donkeys work. The cacao was exported in hand baggage of two Pura Vida shareholders, Sam and Elin. A local man, Gilson, ferried them across the river in his boat to the nearby town of Ubaitaba. The cacao travelled by bus overnight to Salvador from where it is a short plane ride  to San Paolo from where the cheaper international flights to London Heathrow depart. The cotton bag the cacao arrived in has Bahian seed burrs gained in transit still clinging to it. Lottie Child went to St Peters newsagent in Islington, London to pick up the bag - Sam and Elin live next door - then cycled to Govinda Hare Krishna restaurant in Soho to deliver. Along with other hamper products, the cacao was transported to Brussels via wheeled suitcase, train, tube, Eurostar and FoAM company car. Recipe suggestion: grind up a handful of cacao, handful of oats with water and honey in the blender for breakfast. There is no need to remove the shell.
  
 **Feral Hamper agents, couriers, translators & hosts** Abu Naser Robbi, Jelena Stanovnik, Joydev Roaza, Kate Rich, Kayle Brandon, Lina Kusaite, Lottie Child, Maja Kuzmanovic, Nik Gaffney, RicardoYglesias, Sam & Elin, Sneha Solanki, Mrs & Mr Solanki. **Feral Hamper agents, couriers, translators & hosts** Abu Naser Robbi, Jelena Stanovnik, Joydev Roaza, Kate Rich, Kayle Brandon, Lina Kusaite, Lottie Child, Maja Kuzmanovic, Nik Gaffney, RicardoYglesias, Sam & Elin, Sneha Solanki, Mrs & Mr Solanki.
  • feral_hamper.txt
  • Last modified: 2009-02-06 14:26
  • by katerich