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future_fabulators:prehearsing_the_future [2014-02-11 06:28]
nik created
future_fabulators:prehearsing_the_future [2015-07-26 16:35] (current)
nik
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-==== Prehearsing The Future ==== 
-====Prehearsing the future==== 
  
-By Maja Kuzmanovic and Nik Gaffney +====Prehearsing the Future==== 
 + 
 +By Maja Kuzmanovic and Nik Gaffney
  
 //The future is a process, not a theme park.// -- Bruce Sterling((Bruce Sterling, 2002, //Tomorrow Now: Envisioning the Next Fifty Years.// New York: Random House)) //The future is a process, not a theme park.// -- Bruce Sterling((Bruce Sterling, 2002, //Tomorrow Now: Envisioning the Next Fifty Years.// New York: Random House))
  
-If a picture says more than a thousand words, a minute of direct experience says more than words ever can. As children we learned immediately and unequivocally about the consequences of our actions by trying things out. Through play and games we'd put ourselves in new situations, get hurt (or not), try again, laugh a lot at ourselves and others, but ultimately adapt and assimilate new behaviours on a daily basis -- never knowing what a new game might bring. Then gradually we began replacing direct experience with representations: beginning with picturebooks and textbooks, moving on later to news reports and theoretical treatises, statistical models and market projections. There is nothing wrong with representation -- if we had to learn everything we know through direct experience it would take many lifetimes. However, there are some things that remain ungraspable unless we experience them with our own skin. One of these things is the present moment, beginning its life as an unknowable future. +If a picture says more than a thousand words, a minute of direct experience says more than words ever can. As children we learned immediately and unequivocally about the consequences of our actions by trying things out. Through play and games we'd put ourselves in new situations, get hurt (or not), try again, laugh at ourselves and others, but ultimately adapt and assimilate new behaviours on a daily basis -- never knowing what a new game might bring. Then gradually we began replacing direct experience with representations: beginning with picturebooks and textbooks, moving on later to news reports and theoretical treatises, statistical models and market projections. There is nothing wrong with representation -- if we had to learn everything we know through direct experience it would take many lifetimes. However, there are some things that remain ungraspable unless we experience them with our own skin. One of these things is the present moment, beginning its life as an unknowable future. 
  
 We can try to predict or calculate how we may experience a certain moment, but when it arrives it often differs from our expectations. We can complain and get frightened that we can't know what to expect, or we can open up to a sense of wonder and excitement as we used to do in make-believe games. For most children, the question “what if...” opens up a whole fairground of possible games and stories: What if I could fly? What if we lived on water? What if I was an Indian? For many adults the same question tends to bring up deeply sedimented anxieties: what if the economy collapses? What if I have cancer? What if sea levels rise? Curiosity and fear, both very useful mental attitudes when it comes to survival.  We can try to predict or calculate how we may experience a certain moment, but when it arrives it often differs from our expectations. We can complain and get frightened that we can't know what to expect, or we can open up to a sense of wonder and excitement as we used to do in make-believe games. For most children, the question “what if...” opens up a whole fairground of possible games and stories: What if I could fly? What if we lived on water? What if I was an Indian? For many adults the same question tends to bring up deeply sedimented anxieties: what if the economy collapses? What if I have cancer? What if sea levels rise? Curiosity and fear, both very useful mental attitudes when it comes to survival. 
  
-In mindfulness((http://www.mindfulnet.org/page2.htm)) and other meditative practices we learn that our experience of the present moment is largely coloured by our attitudes, grounded in the past and influenced by speculations about the future. We can practice to let go of the past (as we can't change it anyway), but the future is a different thing: we can influence what happens next. As Sarah Connor says in the movie //Terminator II:// “The future is not set. There is no fate but what we make for ourselves.”((http://terminator.wikia.com/wiki/Destiny)) This ability to open up the future doesn't just exist in movies. It is practiced in most children's games, but also in such grown-ups' machinations as strategic foresight, futurology and forecasting, but also improvisation, meditation and disaster drills. All of these quite disparate practices have at least one thing in common: they dare to ask “what if,” then experiment with different answers and observe what happens.+In mindfulness((http://www.mindfulnet.org/page2.htm)) and other meditative practices we learn that our experience of the present moment is largely coloured by our attitudes, grounded in the past and influenced by speculations about the future. We can practice to let go of the past (as we can't change it anyway), but the future is a different thing: we can influence what happens next. As Sarah Connor says in //Terminator II:// “The future is not set. There is no fate but what we make for ourselves.”((http://terminator.wikia.com/wiki/Destiny)) This ability to open up the future doesn't just exist in movies. It is practiced in most children's games, but also in such grown-ups' machinations as strategic foresight, futurology and forecasting, but also improvisation, meditation and disaster drills. All of these quite disparate practices have at least one thing in common: they dare to ask “what if,” then experiment with different answers and observe what happens.
  
 ===Stopping and looking=== ===Stopping and looking===
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 notes about related topics: notes about related topics:
  
-  * [[scenario planning]]+  * [[scenario building]] 
 +  * [[scenario methods]] 
 +  * [[horizon scanning]] 
 +  * [[scenarios]] 
 +  * [[background]]
   * [[:resilients/future_preparedness_notes]]   * [[:resilients/future_preparedness_notes]]
  
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  • by nik