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future_fabulators:what_people_say_about_doing_nothing [2014-10-14 09:25]
maja
future_fabulators:what_people_say_about_doing_nothing [2016-03-27 14:46] (current)
maja
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 ― Mladen Stilinovic ― Mladen Stilinovic
 </blockquote>  </blockquote> 
 +
 +<blockquote>When people say they are bored, often they mean that they don't want to experience the sense of emptiness, which is also an expression of openness and vulnerability. -Chögyam Trungpa </blockquote>
 +
 +
 +<blockquote>Receptivity is not inactivity. It is real activity but not effort in the ordinary sense of the word… It is simply an attitude of waiting for the ultimate mystery. (…) This "active inactivity" is an example of what I think of as "passionate equanimity". Ken reminds me that the Taoists call it "wei wu wei", which literally means "action no action" and which often is translated as "effortless effort". -Treya Wilber </blockquote>
  
  
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 ― Jon Perry, www.structuredprocrastination.com ― Jon Perry, www.structuredprocrastination.com
 +</blockquote>
 +
 +<blockquote>
 +
 +“What I like doing best is Nothing."
 +
 +"How do you do Nothing," asked Pooh after he had wondered for a long time.
 +
 +"Well, it's when people call out at you just as you're going off to do it, 'What are you going to do, Christopher Robin?' and you say, 'Oh, Nothing,' and then you go and do it.
 +
 +It means just going along, listening to all the things you can't hear, and not bothering."
 +
 +"Oh!" said Pooh.” 
 +
 +-Winnie the Pooh
 +
 +</blockquote>
 +
 +<blockquote>
 +I have often wondered whether especially those days when we are forced to remain idle are not precisely the days spend in the most profound activity. Whether our actions themselves, even if they do not take place until later, are nothing more than the last reverberations of a vast movement that occurs within us during idle days.
 +
 +In any case, it is very important to be idle with confidence, with devotion, possibly even with joy. The days when even our hands do not stir are so exceptionally quiet that it is hardly possible to raise them without hearing a whole lot.
 +
 +― Rainer Maria Rilke, Letters on Life 
 +</blockquote>
 +
 +<blockquote>
 +Warten zu müssen ist eine freundliche Einladung zu einer kleinen Meditation.
 +
 +Andreas König (pseudonym for André van Wickeren)
 +
 +</blockquote>
 +
 +<blockquote>
 </blockquote> </blockquote>
  
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 - From the Decree About The Nothingists Of The Poetry (fragment) - From the Decree About The Nothingists Of The Poetry (fragment)
 +</blockquote>
 +
 +
 +
 +<blockquote>
 +The  most  effective  executives  are  those who  can both  act  and  reflect—which  means making  time  to  do  nothing. Doing  nothing involvesunplugging  ourselves  from  the compulsion  to  keep  busy,  the  habit  ofshielding  ourselves  from  certain  feelings,  the tension of trying to manipulate our experience before we fully acknowledge what that experience is.Doing nothing  givesus the opportunity to look atthe dark side of our nature, a domain of great energy and passion. But it takescourage to go to the regions of ourmind that we’re usually busy avoiding.
 +--Manfred F.R. KETS de VRIES
 </blockquote> </blockquote>
  
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 === Online === === Online ===
  
 +  * Manfred F.R. KETS de VRIES, 2014, Doing Nothing and Nothing to Do: The Hidden Value of Empty Time and Boredom. http://www.insead.edu/facultyresearch/research/doc.cfm?did=54261
   * http://www.lanternfanten.nl   * http://www.lanternfanten.nl
   * http://www.startdestilte.be   * http://www.startdestilte.be
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