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lavandula_angustifolia

Common Lavender-Lavandula Angustifolia

lavend13-l.jpg800px-single_lavendar_flower02.jpg

image: http://botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/l/lavend13.html#deseng

perennial shrub, insect attractor, habitat: Dry grassy slopes amongst rocks, in exposed, usually parched, hot rocky situations often on calcareous soils

Physical Characteristics

“An evergreen Shrub growing to 1.2m by 1m. It is hardy to zone 5. It is in leaf all year, in flower from July to September, and the seeds ripen from August to October. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees, Lepidoptera (Moths & Butterflies). It is noted for attracting wildlife. The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and requires well-drained soil. The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils and can grow in very alkaline and saline soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It requires dry or moist soil and can tolerate drought. The plant can tolerate maritime exposure.” http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants.php?Lavandula+angustifolia

History

Edible UsesCondiment; Tea.

Leaves, petals and flowering tips - raw. Used as a condiment in salads, soups, stews etc. They provide a very aromatic flavour and are too strong to be used in any quantity. The fresh or dried flowers are used as a tea. The fresh flowers are also crystallized or added to jams, ice-creams, vinegars etc as a flavouring. An essential oil from the flowers is used as a food flavouring.

http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants.php?Lavandula+angustifolia

Medicinal Uses

Lavender is a commonly used household herb, though it is better known for its sweet-scented aroma than for its medicinal qualities. However, it is an important relaxing herb, having a soothing and relaxing affect upon the nervous system. The flowering spikes can be dried and used internally in a tincture, though the extracted essential oil is more commonly used…

http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants.php?Lavandula+angustifolia

Other Uses

Essential; Hedge; Incense; Pot-pourri; Repellent. The essential oil that is obtained from the flowers is exquisitely scented and has a very wide range of applications, both in the home and commercially. It is commonly used in soap making, in making high quality perfumes

lavandula_angustifolia.txt · Last modified: 2010/02/10 10:48 by nik