Brian Degger, 2008

As humans destroy their environment, we are the sentient creatures responsible for ecosystem preservation and rehabilitation. This might be our one true responsibility, to be true to our living environment. In this role, we envision using a range of technologies, from high technology to grassroots folk-science, to remediate the earth. The destruction of the earths undersea fauna and fauna is occurring continuously, at great distances and depths away from the public eye. The first time the public sees an endangered deep-sea fish is on the dinner plate. Generic white flesh that once was a vibrant member of an undersea community.

We propose that the current climate of industrialized destruction be countered by industrialized reseeding of the oceans. Our work particularly examines the technologies that should exist to carry out this wish. The primary idea we are researching is the construct Bio Ocean Balls(BOBs). Consisting of a mass of larvae from micro to macro sized organisms, BOBs are released into the marine environment where they melt and disperse. This influx of biodiversity into once sterile areas rapidly creates a complete ecosystem.

BOBs differ from their terrestrial equivalent, seedballs, by combining the seeding of both plants and animals in one package.The matrixes used as support the growth of complex organisms and sequester nutrients involved in toxic red tide blooms. In areas starved of suitable habitats, artificial reefs can be sunk to provide a suitable substrate for coral growth outside of influence of coral bleaching. In this, technologies that work with nature will succeed more than those that try brute force effects. So we are thinking along the lines of a substrate for oceanic organisms to fall on, a nurturing environment, a cushioning force. Fabricated substrates for ‘planted’ life resulting in a mediated ecosystem initially. A ‘let there be life rather than just death’ approach.

We are interested in this artistically, philosophically and scientifically. Informed by the general themes: bioscience and biotechnology technologically mediated ecosystems, ecologies and environments, this project examines through video, aspects of mortality, scarcity and abundance. Is the Oceanic Gro Ball alive in its dormant state, or is it in that fine line between being dead and alive? Will all life become the custodians of humans as they continue non-renewable industrial expansion?