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play_and_games [2007-06-14 10:30]
127.0.0.1 external edit
play_and_games [2020-06-15 13:23] (current)
nik
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 ==== play and games ==== ==== play and games ====
  
-"It may well turn out that one of the most important effects of open source's success will be to teach us that play is the most economically efficient mode of creative work." -- ESR (in "the cathedral and the bazaar") +<blockquote>There isn’t a method. Lose everything. Let go completely. Use no energy to fight the storm. Drift. Then play with it
 +<cite>Alan Watts, Thusness</cite></blockquote>
  
 ==== board games ==== ==== board games ====
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   * [[Game of Go]]   * [[Game of Go]]
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 ==== rnd links ==== ==== rnd links ====
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   * "The ludic society exists to provoke an artistic research discipline best to be addressed as ludic studies" http://www.ludic-society.net/   * "The ludic society exists to provoke an artistic research discipline best to be addressed as ludic studies" http://www.ludic-society.net/
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   * [[Game Engines]]   * [[Game Engines]]
   * Play with the machine > http://machinelake.com/   * Play with the machine > http://machinelake.com/
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 ==== Game of life ==== ==== Game of life ====
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 John Conway’s Game of Life, the [[cellular automata]] game John Conway’s Game of Life, the [[cellular automata]] game
  
 Life was devised in 1970 by John Horton Conway, a young mathematician at Gonville and Caius College in Cambridge. The game is played on a 2-dimensional grid. Each cell can be either "on" or "off". Each cell has eight neighbors, adjacent across the sides and corners of the square. The Life rule can be simply expressed (in terms of the way it affects a cell's behavior from one generation to the next) as follows: If a cell is off and has 3 living neighbors (out of 8), it will become alive in the next generation. If a cell is on and has 2 or 3 living neighbors, it survives; otherwise, it dies in the next generation. Life was devised in 1970 by John Horton Conway, a young mathematician at Gonville and Caius College in Cambridge. The game is played on a 2-dimensional grid. Each cell can be either "on" or "off". Each cell has eight neighbors, adjacent across the sides and corners of the square. The Life rule can be simply expressed (in terms of the way it affects a cell's behavior from one generation to the next) as follows: If a cell is off and has 3 living neighbors (out of 8), it will become alive in the next generation. If a cell is on and has 2 or 3 living neighbors, it survives; otherwise, it dies in the next generation.
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 ==== other ==== ==== other ====
- +  * [[playful seriousness]] 
- +  [[Play Asperity Game]] 
-[[Play Asperity Game]]+  * 
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