Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

Both sides previous revision Previous revision
sand_talk [2021-06-01 13:53]
nik
sand_talk [2021-06-01 14:06] (current)
nik
Line 1: Line 1:
 ==== Sand Talk ==== ==== Sand Talk ====
  
-[[reading notes]] for Sand Talk by Tyson Yunkaporta +[[reading notes]] for Sand Talk by Tyson Yunkaporta (still to sort into chapters)
- +
- +
-=== The Porcupine, the Paleo-mind and the Grand Design === +
- +
-=== Albino Boy === +
- +
-=== First Law === +
- +
-=== Forever Limited === +
- +
-=== Lines in the Sand === +
- +
-=== Of Spirit and Spirits === +
- +
-=== Advanced and Fair === +
- +
-=== Romancing the Stone Age === +
- +
-=== Displaced Apostrophes === +
- +
-=== Lemonade for Headaches ===+
  
  
 +==== The Porcupine, the Paleo-mind and the Grand Design ====
  
 <blockquote>I don’t know why Stephen Hawking and others have worried about super-intelligent beings from other planets coming here and using their advanced knowledge to do to the world what industrial civilisation has already done. Beings of higher intelligence are already here, always have been. They just haven’t used their intelligence to destroy anything yet. Maybe they will, if they tire of the incompetence of domesticated humans.</blockquote> <blockquote>I don’t know why Stephen Hawking and others have worried about super-intelligent beings from other planets coming here and using their advanced knowledge to do to the world what industrial civilisation has already done. Beings of higher intelligence are already here, always have been. They just haven’t used their intelligence to destroy anything yet. Maybe they will, if they tire of the incompetence of domesticated humans.</blockquote>
Line 113: Line 93:
  
 <blockquote>If we get stuck, we’ll ask the echidnas for help</blockquote> <blockquote>If we get stuck, we’ll ask the echidnas for help</blockquote>
 +
 +
 +==== Albino Boy ====
  
 <blockquote>This isn’t an archaeological site, to be excavated and observed. It is still inhabited. The boy is still here and he probably doesn’t want uninvited visitors. It’s no monument. The place is alive. Every rock is animate and sentient—but in our worldview this is true of all rocks. Far away there is a secret cave with a miniature replica of the site built on the cave floor. People with the knowledge of how to work with the stones there are said to be able to travel between those sites in the blink of an eye. And these places are connected to stone arrangements all over the continent.</blockquote> <blockquote>This isn’t an archaeological site, to be excavated and observed. It is still inhabited. The boy is still here and he probably doesn’t want uninvited visitors. It’s no monument. The place is alive. Every rock is animate and sentient—but in our worldview this is true of all rocks. Far away there is a secret cave with a miniature replica of the site built on the cave floor. People with the knowledge of how to work with the stones there are said to be able to travel between those sites in the blink of an eye. And these places are connected to stone arrangements all over the continent.</blockquote>
Line 159: Line 142:
  
 <blockquote>Hopefully I have now given you some ideas on what Indigenous Knowledge is and which Indigenous people have it, and what it might be used for. In case you missed them, the answers are everything, all of us, and anything. But who is Indigenous? For the purposes of the thought experiments on sustainability in this book, an Indigenous person is a member of a community retaining memories of life lived sustainably on a land-base, as part of that land-base. Indigenous Knowledge is any application of those memories as living knowledge to improve present and future circumstances.</blockquote> <blockquote>Hopefully I have now given you some ideas on what Indigenous Knowledge is and which Indigenous people have it, and what it might be used for. In case you missed them, the answers are everything, all of us, and anything. But who is Indigenous? For the purposes of the thought experiments on sustainability in this book, an Indigenous person is a member of a community retaining memories of life lived sustainably on a land-base, as part of that land-base. Indigenous Knowledge is any application of those memories as living knowledge to improve present and future circumstances.</blockquote>
 +
 +
 +==== First Law ====
  
 <blockquote>Creation time isn’t a ‘long, long ago’ event, because creation is still unfolding now, and will continue to if we know how to know it.</blockquote> <blockquote>Creation time isn’t a ‘long, long ago’ event, because creation is still unfolding now, and will continue to if we know how to know it.</blockquote>
Line 175: Line 161:
  
 <blockquote>For Australians the hazy old binaries of race have become profoundly unsettling and difficult to pin down on a colour-coded continuum of victims and oppressors. ‘People of colour’ in their struggle for economic equality join the rush to exploit Aboriginal land and resources, and are welcome at the boardroom table as long as they embrace settler values and identities. An Indian company undertakes a project to devastate Aboriginal lands and waters in Queensland with coal mining, and farmers formerly opposed to Native Title now stand beside Traditional Owners to protest the development</blockquote> <blockquote>For Australians the hazy old binaries of race have become profoundly unsettling and difficult to pin down on a colour-coded continuum of victims and oppressors. ‘People of colour’ in their struggle for economic equality join the rush to exploit Aboriginal land and resources, and are welcome at the boardroom table as long as they embrace settler values and identities. An Indian company undertakes a project to devastate Aboriginal lands and waters in Queensland with coal mining, and farmers formerly opposed to Native Title now stand beside Traditional Owners to protest the development</blockquote>
 +
 +
 +==== Forever Limited ====
 +
 +==== Lines in the Sand ====
 +
 +==== Of Spirit and Spirits ====
 +
 +==== Advanced and Fair ====
 +
 +==== Romancing the Stone Age ====
 +
 +==== Displaced Apostrophes ====
 +
 +==== Lemonade for Headaches ====
 +
  
 <blockquote>If the Sami apocalypse had a soundtrack it would be ‘Jingle Bells’.</blockquote> <blockquote>If the Sami apocalypse had a soundtrack it would be ‘Jingle Bells’.</blockquote>
Line 402: Line 404:
 <blockquote>Try pressing your little and ring fingers flat into the desk, or ground, or belly, or any surface where you are reading this—maybe on your arm or on the book itself.</blockquote> <blockquote>Try pressing your little and ring fingers flat into the desk, or ground, or belly, or any surface where you are reading this—maybe on your arm or on the book itself.</blockquote>
  
-=== Duck Hunting is Everybody’s Business ===+==== Duck Hunting is Everybody’s Business ====
  
 <blockquote>But man–woman relations and identities in Aboriginal culture have other layers and complexities, today as well as in the past. There is friction between these sticks, as well as a lot of other kinds of sticks with many different purposes, all of which are vital for sustainable cultures. Some sticks are for fire, others for music or carrying messages. Most sticks are crafted primarily for killing and fighting. Men, women and children customarily all have access to these weapons because in our culture we avoid the unsustainable practice of concentrating violence into the hands of one privileged group, or outsourcing violence to other places so we can enjoy the fruits of it without having to see it. Violence is part of creation and it is distributed evenly among all agents in sustainable systems to minimise the damage it can do. We follow creation, so we must all have high levels of competence when it comes to conflict.</blockquote> <blockquote>But man–woman relations and identities in Aboriginal culture have other layers and complexities, today as well as in the past. There is friction between these sticks, as well as a lot of other kinds of sticks with many different purposes, all of which are vital for sustainable cultures. Some sticks are for fire, others for music or carrying messages. Most sticks are crafted primarily for killing and fighting. Men, women and children customarily all have access to these weapons because in our culture we avoid the unsustainable practice of concentrating violence into the hands of one privileged group, or outsourcing violence to other places so we can enjoy the fruits of it without having to see it. Violence is part of creation and it is distributed evenly among all agents in sustainable systems to minimise the damage it can do. We follow creation, so we must all have high levels of competence when it comes to conflict.</blockquote>
Line 449: Line 451:
  
  
 +==== Immovable Meets Irresistible ====
  
 +==== Be Like Your Place ====
  
- +==== Which Way ====
- +
- +
-=== Immovable Meets Irresistible === +
- +
-=== Be Like Your Place === +
- +
-=== Which Way ===+
  
  • sand_talk.txt
  • Last modified: 2021-06-01 14:06
  • by nik