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wireless_neighborhood_freenet [2007-07-12 11:07]
127.0.0.1 external edit
wireless_neighborhood_freenet [2007-07-12 11:21] (current)
nik
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 The bridging configuration of base stations allows you to turn encryption from 40 bit up to 128 bit, although this will surely slow down the bandwidth a little. In some countries, like France, encryption is not permitted except for ridiculously small keys. The bridging configuration of base stations allows you to turn encryption from 40 bit up to 128 bit, although this will surely slow down the bandwidth a little. In some countries, like France, encryption is not permitted except for ridiculously small keys.
 +
  
 ==== In the Beginning Was the Idea ==== ==== In the Beginning Was the Idea ====
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 In other words, when somebody from the big wild Net wants to reach a web site on the internal Freenet, my Linux box at the border would translate the request and send it to the appropriate server. Since the idea is to centralize all Internet services such as e-mail, Web, Usenet, chat, RealAudio?, and others, it becomes a simple matter of mapping incoming (from the Internet) requests to the servers in my labs. I provided, therefore: In other words, when somebody from the big wild Net wants to reach a web site on the internal Freenet, my Linux box at the border would translate the request and send it to the appropriate server. Since the idea is to centralize all Internet services such as e-mail, Web, Usenet, chat, RealAudio?, and others, it becomes a simple matter of mapping incoming (from the Internet) requests to the servers in my labs. I provided, therefore:
  
- 1. A Linux box (an older Netfinity 3000 with 512-MB RAM and RAID 1) for the connection to the Internet (a 10-mbit connection that I get for free from a telecom company in exchange for some services).+A Linux box (an older Netfinity 3000 with 512-MB RAM and RAID 1) for the connection to the Internet (a 10-mbit connection that I get for free from a telecom company in exchange for some services).
  
- 1. A CerfQube that does firewalling and port forwarding as well as NAT by means of simple but powerful ipchains rules. I chose the CerfQube? because the entire disk image is in EPROM and therefore not write-accessible for crackers and intruders. This highly increases the security of the firewall. I just love the CerfQubes?. Go grab one at their web site 151; they are cheap.+A CerfQube that does firewalling and port forwarding as well as NAT by means of simple but powerful ipchains rules. I chose the CerfQube? because the entire disk image is in EPROM and therefore not write-accessible for crackers and intruders. This highly increases the security of the firewall. I just love the CerfQubes?. Go grab one at their web site 151; they are cheap.
  
- 1. A web/mail/Usenet/IRC/bind 9.1 cluster running LVS (Linux Virtual Servers, www.lvs.org) on 5 rack 1U computers. I chose no-name rack units that have been sitting around idly in my lab. Each has 512 MB of RAM, 18-GB internal disk, and two NICs.+A web/mail/Usenet/IRC/bind 9.1 cluster running LVS (Linux Virtual Servers, www.lvs.org) on 5 rack 1U computers. I chose no-name rack units that have been sitting around idly in my lab. Each has 512 MB of RAM, 18-GB internal disk, and two NICs.
  
- 1. An old Compaq Presario with 40-MB RAM and 2-GB disk with Linux 2.4.7 does the firewalling between our little Freenet and the central servers and my personal lab here. Never trust anyone, right?+An old Compaq Presario with 40-MB RAM and 2-GB disk with Linux 2.4.7 does the firewalling between our little Freenet and the central servers and my personal lab here. Never trust anyone, right?
  
- 1. A set of three redundant Compaq wireless base stations in order to provide some backup should one of them fail. Since I am at the center of our Freenet, I need to provide higher availability.+A set of three redundant Compaq wireless base stations in order to provide some backup should one of them fail. Since I am at the center of our Freenet, I need to provide higher availability.
  
 The crowd immediately understood that I, in fact, provide much more than what they are required to buy, and what the heck! Nobody is forced to become a member anyway. So many people in the end adhered, and today we have a net of about 70-80 individual members, be they private or company or community (a small community library for English books). The crowd immediately understood that I, in fact, provide much more than what they are required to buy, and what the heck! Nobody is forced to become a member anyway. So many people in the end adhered, and today we have a net of about 70-80 individual members, be they private or company or community (a small community library for English books).
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